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Category Archives: Facebook

Tag Archives: Facebook


Facebook Notes: New Updates Breathe Life Back Into Forgotten Feature

In an effort to offer users a more customizable, long-form content option, Facebook recently announced substantial updates to its Notes feature. This announcement had many wondering, myself included, when was the last time anyone actually used the Notes feature? Facebook seemed to have forgotten about Notes – like the rest of us – as the last major update to the feature was back in 2010. As Facebook continues to grow in the world of native content, encouraging its users to use the social network as a place to post their own blog content seems like a smart move.

The most obvious updates to the new Notes are cosmetic ones. You can now add cover photos, caption and re-size photos, and format text into headers, bullets or quotes. There is an option to add a byline and time-stamp and there’s no longer a character limit, making Notes a useful tool for self-expression. Many users have also noticed that Notes looks quite a bit like the popular blogging platform Medium, going so far as to question whether Facebook had hired the same design team.

These new updates, along with Facebook’s introduction of Instant Articles, could significantly change user engagement. And with major media outlets like The New York Times, The Guardian and Buzzfeed already signed up as partners of Instant Articles, PR/marketing pros could see a dramatic shift in the way content is published, shared and tracked. According to Brian Barrett at Wired, “The longer people are writing and reading, the more time they’re spending in their News Feed and Facebook, and the less likely they are to be distracted by some other Internet experience. Readers are more likely to see Facebook ads, and Facebook gets even more insight into the writer.”

So what does this mean long-term for Facebook’s expansion into blogging and native content? At this point it’s too soon to tell. There hasn’t been a huge promotional push around the new updates, and the feature is still buried in a drop-down menu on your profile page. However, it’s clear that Facebook’s goal is to host as much content on its platform as possible instead of just being a source for links that go elsewhere. If users do decide to adopt this new option for long-form content, we could see a definite shift in the way people engage and share information on the social network.

Read more from Caitlin Doherty

Publishing Changing “In An Instant” – Google and Twitter Team Up to Offer Their Own Instant Articles


It seems as though no landscape (with the exception of perhaps the Tien Shan glaciers which are melting at an alarming rate) is changing faster than the media. The latest shift, being pushed out across some of the biggest platforms, is “instant articles.”

Facebook took the first leap back in May, introducing “Instant Articles” as a new way for publishers to push out content quickly and help eliminate the load time (a brutal eight seconds, how impatient are we?) when sharing articles with friends. The move was criticized by some as a way to keep content, and subsequently power, within Facebook’s site and grasp. However, the opportunity to reach a growing number of interested, albeit impatient, readers was enough for publications such as The New York Times and The Atlantic to get on board.

Now Google and Twitter are getting in on the instant game, announcing that they too will be allowing publishers to show “instant articles” to readers who are using their services while on mobile devices. One of the key differences here, however, is that neither Google nor Twitter will be hosting the articles. Unlike Facebook’s approach, the “instant article” that pops up is a “snapshot” of the article hosted on the original publisher’s site. This is of particular importance to those publishers who were not crazy about Facebook being the host to their content, but still want to reach us eager readers who, apparently, possess the attention span of a fruit fly.

But are instant articles the be all and end all of news publishing right now? Nope. Another major media move to watch is by tech’s most glorious fruit, Apple, (a title easily usurped from beans) as they roll out the Apple News App this week. This new app, available with iOS 9, will allow users to read, share and save articles, as well as curate their feeds to include only the news outlets they value.

So what does it all mean? Expect more content, quicker. Speed has long been a key factor in the news industry, and that desire to be the first to publish is certainly extending to how quickly we want to share and consume news. I, for one, welcome our new instant article overlords, even though the eight second delay never really bothered me. Patience is a virtue and I lived through dial-up modems, emerging on the other side a more patient person because of it.

Read more from Lisa Mokaba

Facebook Notes: The Next Publishing Platform?

Man yelling through megaphone

Of all the changes and additions Facebook has instituted thus far in its young history, such as the News Feed layout, profile page layout, cover photo addition and auto-play videos, the sneaky increase in characters may have been the most overlooked.

But as content publishing increasingly looms large on other social platforms, such as LinkedIn and the massive success that Medium has been, Facebook is testing an update to its Notes tool and seemingly transforming it into a Medium-like, long-form publishing platform. What does this mean for all of us self-publishers, from independent bloggers to communications pros and thought leaders across the industry?

1. Facebook is growing up. Late to the game as it may be, Facebook gets credit for finally recognizing the value of long-form posts rather than gimmicky eye-catching headlines created for quick clicks. I won’t go so far as to say the click-bait era is over, but hopefully this contribution can be a major step in the right direction.

2. Reporters, journalists and bloggers have a huge syndication opportunity. It might not be thought of as the immediate, first destination for in-depth pieces the same way that other publishing sites (such as Medium or WordPress) are, but the fact remains: Facebook provides an enormous built-in audience. A quick syndication on a company or author’s Facebook page, with a link back to the original source would be of great help. Writers search out audience segments far and wide, and It might turn out that an enormous audience is sitting right in front of them with eager eyes.

3. Detailed data provides more personalization. Facebook has found success in using highly targeted ads to reach consumers. Users’ likes and link clicks within the site create a good picture of that person, but taking a look at his or her written content offers an entirely new dimension. Tags could easily label topics within a post, and the publishers themselves could possibly get more background on who exactly is reading their stories.

The wide release for the new and improved, blog site-inspired Facebook Notes hasn’t been announced yet, but when it launches it will certainly be worth following. The results could signal a change in Facebook’s direction, as well as further acceleration for the long-form writing trend.

Read more from Kyle Coffee
Police siren

Jump on It: Responding to Breaking News

When all news seems to be “breaking news,” rapid response is a critical tactic for PR and marketing pros. Our expert rapid responder, Lisa Mokaba, recently explained that the best way to handle rapid response is to channel the Fresh Prince and “jump on it.”

If you don’t act immediately, you’ve already missed the opportunity to insert your voice into a short conversation.

News audiences tune in for breaking news updates more frequently and from more devices than ever before. The American Press Institute found 33 percent of Americans read their news throughout the day, and 78 percent use their smartphone to get news.

Further, social media is climbing its way into the top spot as a news source thanks to millennials, as our Beth Monaghan noted in a recent post. Millennials are nearly evenly split between TV (28 percent) and social media (26 percent) as their primary source for news. But the trend is moving away from TV and toward social media. Facebook just announced it will begin directly hosting articles from leading news organizations, including NBC News and The New York Times.

Given this context for how readers are consuming news, we understand that edging into the news cycle requires rapid response. Strategically responding to breaking news, however, demands a balance of thoughtful foresight and planning and immediate action.

You never want to regret hitting send on an email to a reporter containing poorly crafted commentary so it’s important to develop a strong foundation for how your brand and its leadership fit into the ebb and flow of news in the industry.

Take the time to develop a unique perspective about what’s happening within your industry today and where it’s headed. Once the message is well-defined and understood by everyone at the company, your thought leaders can respond to breaking news with timely commentary that adds value to the developing story and reinforces your position in the market.

Here are three additional tips for rapid response:

  • Obvious, but critical – speed: Reporters don’t have time to wait, so neither do you. As soon as a new story breaks and you have insight to add that helps relay this news to readers, get it out there. Reporters will appreciate thoughtful commentary that arrives before they finish filing their pieces.
  • Short soundbites that matter: When you have something unique to say that aligns with the established company principles, frame your thoughts as short soundbites. Whether over the phone or in an email, reporters need quick insights that strengthen their stories, not long-winded paragraphs. Given the time crunch, short and valuable contributions matter most.
  • Establish yourself as a thought leader: If you continue to provide valuable insights about breaking news, you’ll fortify your position as a thought leader in the media. Reporters will come to rely on your expertise, and you’ll reach a wider industry audience through continued dialogue about breaking news events.

Rapid response is a powerful tool to reach the media, but it requires planning to nail the choreography and win the audience.

Read more from Rachael Tucker
Group of Multiethnic Busy People Working in an Office

The Impact of Engagement Science on the News

And you thought those photos of the 10 puppies you had to see before you die were all just for fun. Engagement science is transforming the news business. From Buzzfeed’s listicles to Medium’s focus on reads over clicks. It’s all about the data, which is all about engagement – and it’s increasingly all about social.

Why? The explosion of mobile is changing the way people interact with the news. When we’re sitting in front of our laptops, we search. But on mobile, we sit back. We share, but we rarely search. Consumers let information come to us on our mobile phones via push notifications and the cockpits of our favorite social media platforms.

This train’s momentum is strong. Buzzfeed reports that 71% of millennials visit social media sites daily. And mobile has “taken the lead as the primary platform for social – 60% of time spent on social is on mobile (Buzzfeed/eMarketer). Social media isn’t the only car on this mobile train. Video is driving massive usage. Check out these stats:

This behavioral shift is changing the way people read the news. Facebook is encroaching on the territory of the traditional news home page. We’ve seen media properties such as Mashable publish articles first on Facebook, and we’ve seen click bait taken to a new level by suspicious and anonymous publishers (read The Story Behind Click Bait Cluttering Your Facebook Feed). And last week, even The New York Times got into the Instagram game.

The bottom line: An article, video, infographic, blog post, you name it, is the first step, not the last. It must become social, through earned (and sometimes paid) amplification strategies that can bring the message to its audiences.

Read more from Beth Monaghan
Vector American Football Field, Ball, and Helmets

What PR Pros Can Learn from the NFL Playoffs

The National Football League (NFL) playoffs are one of the most popular (and watched) events of any calendar year. In fact, last year’s Super Bowl was the most-watched TV event in the United States. Ever. And while I’m not thinking much about the impact of PR when my New England Patriots are dismantling the Indianapolis Colts, I can’t help but wonder how the NFL playoff storylines relate to PR after the clock expires. While we could look at the playoffs in general, the story of one Peyton Manning provides the perfect test case for this latest exercise in relating mainstream topics to the science of public relations. Below are four insights that PR pros can take from the NFL playoffs. Apologies in advance to the Peyton Manning fans.

  • We all love stories about people

It’s true. It doesn’t matter if you’re addicted to the NFL or the Kardashians, we all love to hear about other people and their personal stories. This is one of the main reasons why People Magazine and US Weekly have combined circulations of more than 5.5 million. Sports Illustrated and ESPN Magazine have combined circulations of more than five million. These sports publications are newsstand staples not because they provide a recap of game that you have already seen 25 TV highlights for, but because they deliver insights into the personalities of the individuals making the plays. This has certainly been the case with Mr. Manning, who is receiving as much attention for his upcoming decision to play or retire next season as he is for his poor play a couple Sundays ago. As PR pros, it’s important to always remember that personal stories are often just as, if not more, important than the technology breakthrough, new product, funding announcement, etc. If you need a further proof point, just look at the majority of Forbes or Fortune profiles which more often than not focus on an individual to tell the company’s story.

  • Opinions can change in the blink of an eye

For Peyton, it was his own Denver fans booing as he ran off the field following another failed third-down conversion. These were the same fans that cheered for him so passionately when he shattered NFL records last season. We need to remember to constantly monitor how a company is perceived by key opinion leaders. A good product review six months ago does not guarantee identical results even with the same journalist this month. Much like it did for poor Peyton, the opinions of your core influencers can change at a moment’s notice. Stay in front of and try to control these perception shifts, and ensure that you have a plan in place for when the tide turns.

  • Social media is an early driver of opinions while traditional media reinforces these opinions with the facts

Twitter and Facebook are almost as fun to “watch” as the games themselves, with friends and strangers making comical, angry and insightful posts on the competition’s ups and downs. These posts often convey the sentiment that a number of people are feeling at any given moment. For Peyton, there were endless tweets (see below) mocking him to the tune of the Nationwide insurance jingle that he sings throughout a popular TV commercial. There were also several social media posts that highlighted Manning’s lackluster play in the post season. Following those posts, there have been endless articles on sites like and all diving into the big data of sports statistics to prove that yes, Manning does struggle in the playoffs, speculating that age has possibly caught up with him and pontificating on his future in the league.

Peyton Manning Nationwide jingle

This all reinforces the need to drive influence and opinion on social media while using it to direct partners, analysts, customers, prospects, etc. to other sources of content that provide not only additional information but often hard data (think surveys, industry stats, etc.) that back up and reinforce what they are reading on social media.

  • New storylines take over and you get a fresh start (almost)

The good news for Peyton and the rest of us is that another story always comes along. No one will be talking about his poor play or age at the Super Bowl in two weeks. Even his retirement decision will likely be a blip on the NFL interests radar screen. However, when he does actually make his decision to play or retire, then the older stories will be recycled. In the PR industry, we know that the past, particularly the not-so-pleasant past, can often come back from the dead. For instance, when a company that once filed chapter 11 or dealt with a compliance scandal announces its profitability, there is little doubt that those profitability stories will rehash some of the previous negative news items. We need to do our best as PR professionals to keep the media looking forward to what the positive news means for the future of the company, its customers, the local economy, etc. The past is impossible to bury, but making it clear that it has no relevance on what’s to come can help keep everyone focused on the right messages. While most public relations case studies on the NFL focus on crisis communications, the storylines coming out of the playoffs provide good reminders on the core elements of many successful PR programs.

I’m quite certain there are even more synergies between the NFL and PR, and I’ll be sure to give it some more thought…after the Patriots Super Bowl game.

Read more from Keith Giannini
Shocked man covering his mouth with hands

The Story Behind Click Bait Cluttering Your Facebook Feed

The Manufacturing of Virality Through Click Bait’s Shock and Awe 

I probably should have titled this piece, “The Shocking Facebook Fact That Will Blow Your Mind!!!” I’ve been complaining about my Facebook feed, which is cluttered with the click bait of inspiration and outrage, some well meaning, some not.

At first I thought I might be getting jaded as I approach age 40, but it turns out that my sincerity filter is working quite well. I’ve identified the root problem: BuzzFeed seems to have have spawned some fairly ugly stepchildren who are vying for our clicks and likes. Have you heard of Most Amazing Galaxy, Damn, Buzz Newsworthy, OMG Facts or Dose? I hadn’t either. But you’ve seen their headlines, which accompany beautiful photos and often include phrases such as “blow your mind,” “then this happened,” and “you won’t believe.” Many like the “!?” combination and others employ the “!!!” for extra emphasis. In college, a professor told me that women use more punctuation than men because they can’t express themselves as well, so I’ll let this last point go in the event that I’m scarred and therefore biased. Here are some recent examples:

Titanic Dog Woman

I became interested in how these posts proliferate on Facebook, so I picked a story and followed its path. The piece below was posted by a Facebook page called, “How Many Likes for This Photo?” With a black and white horse running in a pasture as its cover photo and a thatched-roof beach house hovering over a teal blue ocean as its profile photo, this page is affiliated with, which has a “contact us” form, but no information about who runs the site. Its Facebook page offers just this: “Combination of all sorts of pics and videos that contain heart warming stories and amazing events from many walks of life from all over the world ♥” Even so, 280,000+ people have liked it, including some of my own Facebook friends. I did find out who runs the site though: a man in Cairo. If you want to take a look, you can find out who owns any site by doing a domain registration search through Network Solution’s WhoIs.


This is a phenomenon of what Sam Whitmore of Sam Whitmore Media Survey calls the “attention economy.” Websites and Facebook pages like those I described above aren’t in the content game: they’re in the attention game. They want clicks to fuel ad sales as far as I can tell, but the business model behind these headlines is still a bit of a mystery since some don’t have ads). If you visit their home pages, you may or may not find information about who runs them.

However, you will likely see this type of pop-up ad. Apparently 312,000+ people have liked on Facebook, which I’m guessing is the source of most of its traffic.

Like Us On Facebook

BuzzFeed started this party and imitation, as the saying goes, is the sincerest form of flattery. I have no quarrel with BuzzFeed though. I admire its approach to reinventing the news business. Whitmore says that BuzzFeed is amassing the requisite revenue to become a formidable source of original and award-winning journalism, aspiring even to winning Pulitzers one day. He also pointed me to BuzzFeed’s data blog, which is a directional hint at where “engagement science” is heading. There’s no denying BuzzFeed’s traction. Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends Report put it at 130MM+ unique visitors with 3x year-over-year growth. And as you can see from this Nieman tweet, even The New York Times is taking BuzzFeed seriously.

Nieman tweet

BuzzFeed aside, while consumers scrutinize Facebook’s privacy policies, they aren’t yet aware of the machine behind “virality.” Very often, virality is manufactured. In the Jan 5, 2015 issue of The New Yorker Andrew Marantz’s “The Virologist” describes the efforts of one company, Spartz Inc., which has built a thriving business by creating websites dedicated to click bait. Marantz quotes Neetzan Zimmerman, former chief aggregator at Gawker, regarding the originality of Spartz’s content for one of its flagship sites, Dose. Zimmerman said:

“On Dose, you see entire lists that are ripped whole-sale from other Web sites and passed off as their work.” He noted, however, that it does not make Spartz’s work any less lucrative.

This all rubs me the wrong way, more so because the approach works. I’d like to think we’re all smarter than that — that we don’t fall for the manufactured (albeit luring) bait. On Facebook it doesn’t matter I suppose. We’re all just there for fun, after all, and what’s wrong with a little inspiration? Nothing really.

I’m in the business of ideas though as the co-founder of a PR firm. I’m not interested in temporary traction. My clients want to build “customer loyalty” and create the right “customer journey.” These terms may be tired buzz words, but loyalty is not a joke. Loyalty requires a company to earn its customers’ interest, and then expand that into trust. A click is the first date and if your content is boring or inauthentic, it’s the last one. To get a person to click, read and come back for more, you need thoughtful and original content that sprouts from unique and validated viewpoints. That is what makes platforms like Medium so powerful (Medium prioritizes reads over clicks).

Will these click bait headlines continue to proliferate on Facebook? I don’t know. Facebook has a history of requiring authenticity. Last year it stopped letting drag queens use their stage names and in 2012, it disabled millions of pet accounts because they were “fake” (the drag queen rule has been reversed and I see a lot of pets on Facebook these days). Is click bait authentic? Probably. Original? That’s questionable. It might not matter though because the rules for personal and business pages are different, which likely puts this in the realm of preference versus policy. Whatever happens, it has my attention and I’m going to keep watching (while I try not to click).

As for me, I’m spending more time on Instagram (owned by Facebook), which, by its inherent nature focuses on beautiful — and original — photos. Have you seen the @Food page? Sarah Phillips, the creator, has 340,000 followers and a recent profile in The New York Times, The First Family of Instagram.” For you dog lovers, check out #DogsofInstagram. More please.

Food Instagram

Read more from Beth Monaghan

The Six Most Attention Grabbing Hashtags of 2014

Hashtags. You see them in almost every form of communication these days. Your friend from high school tweets that it was #legday at the gym and your cousin posts about their #blessed weekend. Jimmy Fallon even has an ongoing skit where he and the guest on his show that night talk exclusively in hashtags. In fact, you can barely watch a TV show without being shown its hashtag encouraging viewers to join the conversation (thank you #PeterPanLive). If you’re trying to be cute about not really apologizing, #sorrynotsorry is a good one, but it’s not all snark like at Thanksgiving, when we are all #thankful.

So what were the most attention grabbing hashtags of 2014? These are my picks:

  1. #ALSIceBucketChallenge – This summer the #ALSIceBucketChallenge was inspired by Pete Frates, former baseball captain at Boston College. Pete Frates was diagnosed with ALS. The challenge consisted of individuals dumping ice water over their heads to support ALS and then challenging other friends to do the same or donate (or do both!). First it was just everyone’s friends and family taking part in the challenge and then quickly got the attention of Hollywood: Ben AffleckJennifer Aniston, Leonardo Dicaprio, and Neil Patrick Harris to name a few (those are really just a few, so many celebrities took the challenge!). To date, the #ALSIceBucketChallenge has raised more than $100 million for ALC research. In fact, Cathy Corwin recently included the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in her #breaktheinternet post.
  2. #Sochi – The Winter Olympics were held in Sochi, Russia this year and seemed as if the conversation around the games started before the games actually started. There was controversy around the 51 billion dollar price tag and concern that the city would even be ready for the games. Then, the stories of the poor accommodations of journalists came pouring in and another hashtag was created – #SochiProblems. That hashtag took off so fast that an account for @SochiProblems was quickly set up. Once the games started, people couldn’t stop talking about Bob Costas’ pink eye and the dangerous courses plaguing the athletes. All in all, the games went smoothly but social media sure had fun following the drama.
  3. #BringBackOurGirls – At a UNESCO event on April 23 Dr. Oby Ezekwesili, the vice president of the World Bank for Africa, gave a speech for the opening ceremony honoring the Nigerian city of Port Harcourt as the 2014 World Book Capital City. In her speech, she mentioned the recent kidnapping of over 200 school-age girls, issuing the call to “bring back our daughters.” A Nigerian lawyer named Ibrahim M Abdullahi was watching the streamed speech in Abuja (the nation’s capital), and phrased Dr. Ezekwesili’s emotive words on Twitter using the hashtags #BringBackOurDaughters and #BringBackOurGirls. He unknowingly sparked an online social activism campaign that was top news story across the world. Soon, the likes of Michelle Obama, Mary J. Blige, Amy Poehler, and Hillary Clinton were joining the conversation but voicing their support. The social movement was called a lesson in Twitter activism.
  4. #RIPRobinWilliams – Towards the end of the summer, beloved actor Robin Williams passed away at the age of 63. As soon as the news was announced via social media, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram were flooded with quotes and images from his great films (Mrs. Doubtfire anyone?). Disney posted a tribute to their Facebook page and it took off like wildfire. They also scheduled viewings of Aladdin on their channel with the tribute at the end. There was also much social conversation around the matter of his death but we’d rather keep this mention a positive one.
  5. #MH370 – In March, Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 departing from Kuala Lumpur and scheduled to arrive in Beijing disappeared into mid-air. Literally. Air traffic control received the aircraft’s last message when it was over the South China Sea, less than an hour after takeoff and hasn’t been heard from since. Social media took off with theories of what could have happened (my personal favorite was one that connected the disappearance to LOST, the classic ABC drama). Even Courtney Love was making her theories heard, offering herself up as an expert. To date, the plane is still missing.
  6. #Ferguson – In August, an unarmed teen named Michael Brown was shot by Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, MI. It soon sparked a fire on traditional and especially social media. As Brown was an unarmed, black teenager and Office Darren Wilson (whose name wasn’t released to the public for quite some time) was white, a race war was ignited. Protesters and people who just wanted to get the story were following and engaging with the #Ferguson hashtag. Many of the speculations around what really happened, who saw what, played out via social media as it usually does with this type of news. On the evening of November 24, it was announced that Officer Wilson would not be indicted for the murder of Michael Brown which only ignited the fire more both on the streets of Ferguson (and other large U.S. cities) and on social media.

So there you have it, 2014 as told by a handful of the year’s most attention grabbing hashtags (for more about the top hashtags and happenings of 2014, check out this blog from Twitter). I for one am looking forward to see what conversations gain traction in 2015. #SeeYouLater2014

Read more from Kristen Zemeitus

Storify Upgrades its Platform to Embrace Collaboration


If you’re reading this blog, you probably don’t need a lesson in the power of social media to bring your message to the masses. However, with a relentless timeline of real-time tweets and Facebook posts, it can be challenging to extract stories and themes.

This is where Storify comes in handy. In case you’re not familiar with it, Storify is a Web platform that allows you to curate and publish social information from around the Web into one central location. Its beauty is it allows you to aggregate a collection of social elements from many voices and then publish them as a singular story. If you’re in need of an example of this platform (and a laugh), enjoy the best case of viral marketing I’ve seen in a while: The Storify of a guy live tweeting a couple’s breakup on the roof of his apartment building. We’ve used Storify several times here on the InkHouse blog and reporters often use it as reporting tool, assembling differing points of view on a topic, like this one by Matthew Ingram – or for gathering a selection of social posts from a news event, like this one from Andy Carvin.

As the next stage of its evolution (and likely as a move to bring some additional revenue in for their owner, Livefyre), Storify announced an enterprise version this week which included a redesigned homepage, an updated story editor and a host of new features. Targeted at its big name publishing customers like BBC, Yahoo! and HBO, these new features offer a premium option to those seeking to optimize their online storytelling.

Most notably, Storify has taken a page from Google’s notebook, offering more opportunity for real-time collaboration. Much like with Google documents, with Storify Enterprise you can now have multiple people editing, adding to and fact-checking stories all at the same time. The new platform also features integration with Google Analytics, SEO compatibility and premium-only support technicians. By using analytics to determine the successes of your stories, you can inform your future strategies, honing your ability to create engaging content.

Finally, as a light-hearted bonus, the folks at Storify have hidden a few Easter eggs around their website – including, strangely, an image of Matt Damon somewhere on their homepage. We’ll go ahead and leave that one to you to find on your own.

Storify is an obvious tool for consumer-facing brands, but it can also inject personality into b2b technology companies and non-profits that are seeking to break down the walls that separate them from customers. Ultimately, no matter what vertical you’re in, if your business values social media as a core part of your engagement strategy, Storify provides a tool that can bring it to life.

Read more from Alex Ingram

New E-book: Read It, Watch It, or Tweet It – How Americans Read and Share News

We live in an age where reputations can be made or broken in seconds on Twitter, when potential criminal suspects are identified by communities on Reddit, and President Obama is doing online video interviews with Zach Galifianakis on Funny or Die’s “Between Two Ferns.” It’s up to 304,000 Facebook likes.

The news media is undergoing a powerful transformation as new outlets sprout up to reinvent an aging business model. At InkHouse, we’re closely watching The Information, Circa, re/code, TheOnSwitch, and of course, Buzzfeed (if I listen to the results of its quizzes, I should move to Tennessee, become a writer and live the rest of my life as Bill Clinton).

We wondered how people’s habits have really changed in the wake of all of the hype, so we teamed up with GMI Lightspeed to find out. We surveyed 1,000 people ages 18+ to find out how they prefer to get their news, what they trust more and how they share it. Some results were surprising, some were funny, and some were what we expected.

Check out our ebook for the complete results and our recommendations.
Just want the highlights? See our infographic below and our press release.

Read more from Beth Monaghan